arduino nano pinout

 


 
However, the cheaper version, which is esp8266 on its own, requires a little bit more love. As you can see in front of you it’s a lot smaller and it’s a lot more difficult to connect to a breadboard. However, we are going to find a way to connect. It but I’ll be using a few bits and pieces that you can use regularly on a regular basis to set it up with a guaranteed power supply. So what we’re going to need is an ESP unit. This is the zero one model, as you can see. It’S, quite small, a few pins already said, I’ve on it, but, like I said, those pins are difficult to plug into the two, the breadboard and connect to your cable. So what we’re going to use is a nano over here which I bought from some founder nice and cheap and I’ll use that board continuously to connect to the PC and use it as a power supply. Now you can use this for your project or keep it to connect all your ESP devices you’re going to need some jumper cables, and I took some smaller jumper cables. Also, you can use an ohm resistor as a jumper cable in this case, but I’m not going to use it so let’s get started. We’Ll set up the ground cable to the ground that’s. The first thing we want to do. I used like two second say before I’d, like to keep my cables colored so ground to ground red to VCC, which is the three point three on this chord.

After that I used like to use my colors in this case, I’ll be using yellow to our X. Then green to TX, I can show those are connecting properly I’ll use the gray cable to set to the reset and the blue to set to the GPG HPD, which, on the board says en that’s the one you want to connect it to the G HPD. Then brown to GPIO 2 and purple the GPIO 0. So now we’ve got our cable set up here. For now we can connect it to the breadboard there we go making sure that’s. All nice and tight setup will carefully place the Nano onto the breadboard making sure not to bend the pins, making sure that that’s a mini USB port on the Nano. Just so you know it’s not on micro USB. You may have a different version, but in this case it’s a micro allowed mini excite all right, let’s get the cable sorted up so we’re going to make sure everything is kept connected in the right order. Here, I’m, going to start off with, is try to get the order so it’s easy to remember I’m, going to probably grab a hold of the ground to get started with, connect that using green, which is the TX red, which is VCC brown, which is the GPIO 2 and purple GPIO 0 and blue the CHP D, yellow, Rx and gray reset. Now I found the gap between the two cables here was too far apart, so I reset it again, which you get the general idea.

You got those all set up now using the Nano. Fine is very easy because it’s a like a like easy to configure board as well as it’s an easy power supply. Other power supplies like usb to serial can be a bit funky, and I find this to be a more stable and easy to set up. But you can use an ohm resistor in this case I’m using Android K, resistor but and I’m actually going to use a red, jumper cable to be more visual doesn’t, make any difference as no current. That will be passing through I’m going to be using that from the CHP d2, the VCC so we’re making sure those two are connected and I’m going to do a little bit of zoom in here. So you get a better close up, so you can see those cables are going and then we are going to connect the GPI 0 to ground. Now this connection will put the ESP into programming mode that’s what we really want at the end of the day. So once we’ve done this, we basically want to get ready to set up the connection to the computer, which is through the Nano first thing we need to do is get that out the way and connect the reset to ground. This will put the board into sort of a null and void, it’ll be like a pass through, and then we need to connect the aurochs which is yellow, if you remember earlier to the Oryx, so just a close up there, so you can see the RX pin Is put that in and connect it to the yellow cable? Like I said I like to keep my cables all colorful and matching, and then the TX you can never look there on the board with the cable looks like and then the TX to the TX, which is green to green.

These cables are little bit. I got ta get in sometimes and that’s that connected so the power supply let’s make sure that we have the 3.3 volt connected. Let’S move the ESP cord of the way and grab us a red cable here, keeping everything in color fashion and putting that in the 3.3 volt on the Nano board and connecting it to the VCC on the ESP, which is right through all these little cables. Yet there and finally, the ground which will be next, you go, you got a nice clear view of what’s going on here. Tom is that I don’t have any black cables left site to use blue, which goes against my principles, but in this case, when you don’t have you have to make do so from the ground pin to the ground. Pin of the ESP that’s your board pretty much set up to program. Where did you go? We just need to connect the USB and connect it to the computer. Nice little finale hardware setup and we can move on to programming, so let’s get the Arduino IDE started. If you haven’t got it installed earlier, you remember how to install it from previous videos, not difficult go to the web site close that down. First thing we need to do is go to preferences to make sure idle board manager has the URL which will be included in the YouTube, video click so over the tools and board manager. First thing we do is go over to is it’s contributed, which is the drop down there and we’re.

Looking for the ESP community install here, I’ve done it already so let’s skip that close it down just to make sure it’s installed once it’s installed and then we’re going to look for a few examples. Oh yeah, first to look for the board, go down and then you’ll find a new thing called the generic USB click that board make sure that there’s a comm set up for it it’s, not necessarily just yet the way. I’M, connected and we’ll go to file preferences and examples and we’ll go down to ESP Wi Fi, and this is a really good way to take to see if the boards working open. That example is this called scan. Wi Fi scan, compile it just make sure that they’re compiled through not sure if the text is going to be good in low quality videos, but you might want to put it up to the highest value. So you can see what’s going on here, so once that’s compiled, which will be in a few seconds, make sure that you set the serial monitor to the value above, which is 11 5200 it’s important to remember. I had nothing better to do so. I just kept reminding everybody there and we’re compiled now, so what we’re going to do is upload this to the board and that’s. Hopefully everything should go well. What do you think it is done? The upload and she’s up and running those little dots that’s, always a good sign.

So now this programs basically you’re just going to scan for the Wi Fi in the area it’s. Only to give you an example of that, the fact that the board is programmable, like I said there’s a lot more – you can do with this board. It’S cheap, it’s, easy to use it’s efficient, like, for example, sitting up on relays that kind of thing right tools. Serial monitor booyah now scanning all the wi fi’s in a local area. Not only does that it gives you an example with the strength is for this card, so we’re up and running and the Internet is available if you’ve got the programming skills, so use your fancy and make something cool, but on one last note make sure that this Is what it looks like when you set it up plug it in the USB, and it should be blinking like this when it is uploading, if it’s not that’s, not cool and things are not set up right. Some versions of the ESP down come with a red LED, but if the blue is blinking, you’re all good have a good one.

 
 

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official.arduino
2019-10-01T16:17:23+0000

Researchers have developed a new strategy to enhance interactions between humans and swarms of drones.
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official.arduino
2019-10-01T12:38:15+0000

For the first time ever, we’ll be participating in the
Hacktoberfest monthlong celebration of open source software.

Contribute! github.com/arduino/arduino-cli is a good place to start joining the fun!

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Comment (33)

  1. I think the mini socket is the better socket than the micro more reliable but you can get an adapter for 01 that makes it easy to connect but interesting video thanks

  2. Thanks mate, I’ve been trying to use this board with no success for months. Now it’s working!!

  3. This is very clear! Tnx but i have 1 question.. Rx-Rx and Tx-Tx?? Some videos are Rx-Tx and Rx-Tx.. Can you explain me this? Tnx☺

    1. if i’m not wrong it is because you are using the nano just as a usb to serial ttl converter, that is also the reason why he also connect the reset pin to ground to avoid listen for the atmega328 for commands

  4. Guys if you get any error, unplug first the esp8266 to the arduino(either the vcc or ground) then click the upload button. When it says uploading, reconnect the esp8266 to the arduino and it will be successful. But in my case, I was successful in uploading but when i clicked the serial monitor, nothing happens. I think my esp8266 wifi module is damaged.

  5. Thank you so much. That is working for me. I think this is the only correct video and tutorial among many tutorials around the net.

  6. Why am i facing this error?

    esptool.FatalError: Failed to connect to ESP8266: Timed out waiting for packet header

    1. For those experiencing upload Fatal error problem. After everything is assembled, put a ground switch on the ESP8266 reset pin. Power up the arduino nano and esp8266. Press reset pin for half a sec. Then upload program. GPIO-2 DOES NOT need to be 3.3V HIGH.

  7. Hello Sir , I did the setup exactly as you instructed here…..but I am getting this error “Timed out waiting for packet header”. Can’t get rid of it. The internet is telling different things. Can you please suggest anything

    1. For those experiencing upload Fatal error problem. After everything is assembled, put a ground switch on the ESP8266 reset pin. Power up the arduino nano and esp8266. Press reset pin for half a sec. Then upload program. GPIO-2 DOES NOT need to be 3.3V HIGH.

    2. @renaldi primaswara For those experiencing upload Fatal error problem. After everything is assembled, put a ground switch on the ESP8266 reset pin. Power up the arduino nano and esp8266. Press reset pin for half a sec. Then upload program. GPIO-2 DOES NOT need to be 3.3V HIGH.

  8. I followed as per your instruction . i got an errot
    “exit status -1073741515

    Error compiling for board Generic ESP8266 Module.

  9. NORVI IIOT – ESP32 for industrial projetcs

    Industrial ESP32, Ready for multiple IDE : Arduino and ESP-IDF
    USB Programmable Industrial ESP32 with OLED Display and din-rail mount
    Not just a ESP32 in a industrial enclosure, it has designed for protection and reliability.

    http://www.norvi.lk

  10. For those experiencing upload Fatal error problem. After everything is assembled, put a ground switch on the ESP8266 reset pin. Power up the arduino nano and esp8266. Press reset pin for half a sec. Then upload program. GPIO-2 DOES NOT need to be 3.3V HIGH.

  11. d to connect to ESP8266: Timed out waiting for packet header
    esptool.FatalError: Failed to connect to ESP8266: Timed out waiting for packet header

    i got this error

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