arduino knight rider

Actually I wanted to have a Cylon scanner for even when it’s not Halloween. I, like Cylon scanners, they’re, cool they’re, awesome so, and I wanted to have one that I could either put on my kids on a t, shirt or or put in a jack o’ lantern jack o’ lantern Cylon and I went out on the internet and searched the Web and there’s a lot of silence scanners out there. Most of them are which our DIY is really ugly, with just one LED lighting up at a time and really erratic movement. Not not this fluid really Cylon scary type, but I find one found one that was using shorter flexing someone sold a kid for that, for I think about about 10, even that scientists had a kit. Of course, it was, I think, seven dollars and then shipping on that and it would. It would be a lot of money. Someone had reverse engineered the evil, mad scientist one, however, it didn’t work and and the guy who did it didn’t, respond to comments for a couple of years, so it was and it wasn’t on from the beginning, it wasn’t for Arduino and the reverse engineered one. Just well it didn’t work so, but then I found this guy runaway pancake over at Arduino CC at the forums and he he had made this one. He he’s got he’s got full credit for the code for this Cylon scanner. Actually it’s called the Larson scanner it’s, because it’s made by a guy Glenn a Larson who’s, the guy, who made the effect for the Cylons and fun fact also for kids, the you know, those of you who remember that series Knight Rider – and I think, it’s in The 80s and 90s, where David Hasselhoff ran this or ran around no, he didn’t run he drove away around with this self driving car and talking car and well.

He had a Cylon scanner as well. Larson scanner so same effects anyway, runaway pancake. He he has had another approach instead of using Charlie flexing and and PBM and stuff like that, you don’t have their. This is a ten led, a Cylon scanner. You don’t have ten hardware’s and pvn pins. You can do it with software pbn and stuff like that, but he went. He went too rudimentary and went down to went down on the assembler level and port manipulated we’re used port manipulation, which made this effect so I’ll link to the forum post. Where you can get this code, you can also get a lot of other codes for different patterns. He put up a lot of different patterns there so really works perfectly on the IDE wand at all and yeah it’s, really beautiful anyway, except for the Cylon scanner. I didn’t want to put the whole Arduino development platform on my kids, even though this would be cool it would. The Cylon meets Darth Vader or something like that, but well yeah. I wanted to have a just one board and if something would happen, I still have my development board intact. So I did a really really really bare board Arduino for this one here’s, just a pin it’s just for testing, so it works. So what I’m gon na show now is how to make this really really really bare board Arduino. We begin by plugging out the power and away these there plug away that for the moment.

So you you begin by by by uploading the sketch you want with the platform, and I hope I don’t have to show you how to do that. Yeah it’s, I mean, if you know, Arduino you’ve done it so so, once the the Arduino code is on this chip, you can actually remove the chip carefully there. So this is here’s the Cylon scanner code on this chip now it’s the a 2 mega 328 chip. So what you do is you, if you want to be able to reprogram it and move it around, you put sockets for the 328 on the solar board and you solder it and using a link to that one as well. Using just pin out diagram you, you connect power, 5, volts and ground to the Arduino. I don’t know if you need both sides, but the diagram shows both that you have a just plus 5 volts and ground them on both sides. I think it’s for pin 2022 and yeah some other ports on the other side. Then you connect the LEDs and through port digital port 2 through 11. I think it was count yeah no 12, 2 to 12, whatever temp or um, from port to counting 10 ports. You connect that to the plus pin of the LEDs, and yes, I did cheat a bit here and I’m, not using resistors I’ve been using this for hours and it’s, probably gon na work 4 hours more it’s. I know you should have them.

I don’t it’s. It was I didn’t want to put down that much work, extra it’s, another 10 components and since your port manipulating it’s, not that they’re not on at full strength at any time. So I really don’t see that and that there’s reason for resistors when that said. Of course, if you want to use resistors, you could do that, but I wanted to port and keep the chip countdown music component count done so, except for the 10 LEDs and 180 mega 328. One component left and that’s CT T 16 megahertz oscillator, not crystal resonator. So it’s a resonator and people say that well it’s, not as good as a later, but I mean come on. You’Re gon na just switch some let’s back and forth. It really isn’t that big a deal if, if it’s off one millisecond from time to time – and you can buy these three of these costs – point nine or ninety nine cents at on eBay when including shipping worldwide. So a really cheap way to get an Arduino going at 16 megahertz. You can make it this. You don’t need that you, I think you can somehow make it run on the internal oscillator, but well I like it was much easier just to you. Don’T have to change anything in the IDE or anything. If you just use a small oscillator and that one is, it uses three pins. I don’t know if you can see it here, you connected to edge pins.

That depends on the edges to the two oscillator pins on the on the 80 mega chip and the middle pin you connect to ground and you’re good to go. So now we just plug in our Arduino, and you know the you count. The number one pin is the one on the left, where you have a small intention in the in the plastic package, and also sometimes you got a round symbol showing that that’s pin 1 and also on make sure that you put when you put the socket in That you put the socket in with the intention in the right position, so you know that intention there and intention here and then you are you put the chip in correctly and you need to push a bit here. So everything works so Arduino and oscillator LEDs. Nothing! More, you do, however, need a power source, and for that I am going to use the Arduino now so 5 volts and ground connect, which one was ground. Grady was ground like that. If you have it in a jack o’ lantern, I mean you just get 5 volts from somewhere. You can, if you want to keep it on your kids, I actually haven’t or on yourself by all means. I haven’t really tried to just plug in three Triple A batteries and and see if it works. Maybe you need to have a small 7805 to really make sure that it’s pure 5 volts – and I can’t and try that yet so I’ll look on LED – is not working cold soldier, probably the second one.

Yeah I’m, a badass older guy at the moment, so there’s there’s a bad soldier there anyway. So really really really bare board.

 
 

arduino knight rider Video

 

 

 

 

 

 

arduino knight rider news

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

arduino knight rider Social

 

 

 

 

official.arduino
2019-09-11T22:40:32+0000

Cornell University’s new stretchable optical lace could enable robots to sense how they interact with their environment and adjust their actions accordingly.
safe image.php?d=AQDXADPj1D27 t G&w=720&h=720&url=fbstaging%3A%2F%2Fgraph.facebook - arduino knight rider
official.arduino
2019-09-11T19:19:35+0000

A fun way for students to learn about the brachistochrone curve!
safe image.php?d=AQArTUHNIZGT7f9q&w=720&h=720&url=https%3A%2F%2Fblog.arduino.cc%2Fwp content%2Fuploads%2F2019%2F09%2FF60EQG4JYMTCR7E.LARGE  - arduino knight rider
lI1VUK  normal - arduino knight rider
YouMakeRobots
Sat May 26 09:11:15 +0000 2018


RT @AllArduino: #arduino https://t.co/WGPMaUtDR5 Knight Rider LEDs (via Software PWM)

https://t.co/WGPMaUtDR5
BAlEFgAV normal - arduino knight rider
AllArduino
Sun Jun 15 16:42:59 +0000 2014


#arduino https://t.co/WGPMaUtDR5 Knight Rider LEDs (via Software PWM)

https://t.co/WGPMaUtDR5

Lego KITT

filmVR photo

KNight Riders Glove works!

thinkinginsomniac photo

2016-04-15T14:35:45



 photo

2016-04-15T14:35:40



 photo

2016-04-15T14:35:36



 photo

 

 

(Visited 35 times, 1 visits today)

About The Author

You might be interested in

Comment (17)

  1. Glen A. Larson didn’t made the effect, he was the creator of battle star galatica and knight rider. (He might had had the idea, though)

    1. Sorry no, but they are really easy and cheap to make though… I only have this one, so if you are building a cylon army I cant help you… 😉 

    2. @Maxwell Mac Sorry for late reply, If you still havent found one, I know that Evil Mad Scientist is selling a kit, I think it is quite similar to original: http://shop.evilmadscientist.com/productsmenu/tinykitlist/152-scanner?qh=YToxOntpOjA7czo2OiJsYXJzb24iO30%3D

    1. Here is the one I wrote, only 8 LEDs though.

      void setup() {
        // initialize digital pin 13 as an output.
        pinMode(7, OUTPUT);
        pinMode(6, OUTPUT);
        pinMode(5, OUTPUT);
        pinMode(4, OUTPUT);
        pinMode(3, OUTPUT);
      }

      // the loop function runs over and over again forever
      void loop() {
          digitalWrite(2, HIGH);   // turn the LED on (HIGH is the voltage level)
        delay(40);              // wait for a second
        digitalWrite(4, LOW);    // turn the LED off by making the voltage LOW
        delay(40);   
        
        digitalWrite(3, HIGH);   // turn the LED on (HIGH is the voltage level)
        delay(40);              // wait for a second
        digitalWrite(1, LOW);    // turn the LED off by making the voltage LOW
        delay(40);              // wait for a second
        
        
        digitalWrite(4, HIGH);   // turn the LED on (HIGH is the voltage level)
        delay(40);              // wait for a second
        digitalWrite(2, LOW);    // turn the LED off by making the voltage LOW
        delay(40); 
        
        
        digitalWrite(5, HIGH);   // turn the LED on (HIGH is the voltage level)
        delay(40);              // wait for a second
        digitalWrite(3, LOW);    // turn the LED off by making the voltage LOW
        delay(40); 
        
        
        digitalWrite(6, HIGH);   // turn the LED on (HIGH is the voltage level)
        delay(40);              // wait for a second
        digitalWrite(4, LOW);    // turn the LED off by making the voltage LOW
        delay(40); 
        
        
        digitalWrite(7, HIGH);   // turn the LED on (HIGH is the voltage level)
        delay(40);              // wait for a second
        digitalWrite(5, LOW);    // turn the LED off by making the voltage LOW
        delay(40); 
        
        
          digitalWrite(8, HIGH);   // turn the LED on (HIGH is the voltage level)
        delay(40);              // wait for a second
        digitalWrite(6, LOW);    // turn the LED off by making the voltage LOW
        delay(40);   
        
        digitalWrite(9, HIGH);   // turn the LED on (HIGH is the voltage level)
        delay(40);              // wait for a second
        digitalWrite(7, LOW);    // turn the LED off by making the voltage LOW
        delay(40);              // wait for a second
        
        
          digitalWrite(8, HIGH);   // turn the LED on (HIGH is the voltage level)
        delay(40);              // wait for a second
        digitalWrite(8, LOW);    // turn the LED off by making the voltage LOW
        delay(40);   
        
          digitalWrite(7, HIGH);   // turn the LED on (HIGH is the voltage level)
        delay(40);              // wait for a second
        digitalWrite(9, LOW);    // turn the LED off by making the voltage LOW
        delay(40);   
        
        
          digitalWrite(6, HIGH);   // turn the LED on (HIGH is the voltage level)
        delay(40);              // wait for a second
        digitalWrite(8, LOW);    // turn the LED off by making the voltage LOW
        delay(40);   
        
        
        digitalWrite(5, HIGH);   // turn the LED on (HIGH is the voltage level)
        delay(40);              // wait for a second
        digitalWrite(7, LOW);    // turn the LED off by making the voltage LOW
        delay(40); 
        
        
        digitalWrite(4, HIGH);   // turn the LED on (HIGH is the voltage level)
        delay(40);              // wait for a second
        digitalWrite(6, LOW);    // turn the LED off by making the voltage LOW
        delay(40); 
        
        
        digitalWrite(3, HIGH);   // turn the LED on (HIGH is the voltage level)
        delay(40);              // wait for a second
        digitalWrite(5, LOW);    // turn the LED off by making the voltage LOW
        delay(40); 

      }

    2. @KidCommentaterHD Thanks for the code. But the difference is that your code is the “static” kind, where it is just one LED at a time turning on and off. What Runaway Pancake did in the code used in this project is that it is 10 leds that is smoothly fading so its a LED with a trailing fading tail kind of. It was this effect I was looking for as it is more like the KIT and CYLON effect (which used light bulbs which are slower fading in themselves). Anyways thanks again for the code 🙂

    3. No problem, thank you. I just got an arduino the other day, and that was the first thing I coded myself. So it will get better.

  2. I think an Arduino is wasted for this very simple application. Even a NANO is bigger than the classical 555 + 4017 (sequencer OR light show “IC combo”) and a bunch of 1N4148’s (to drive the LEDs fore and back and in groups).

    1. Ah, but if you watch carefully youll see that the LEDs arent just turning on and off, they are fading as a REAL cylon 😉 so I wouldnt say totally wasted…

    2. I see. But you could probably add different values of resistors in series with the diodes and get a similar effect. Well, at the cost of a little complexity added to the circuit. But this doesn’t scare you so much, normally… 😉

    3. It has to be put into the equation that when I made this atmega328s cost less than a dollar. I’m not sure why they have risen in price the last couple of years?…

LEAVE YOUR COMMENT

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *